Recent Fire Damage Posts

Successfully Avoiding Fire Hazards in the Kitchen | SERVPRO® of Pueblo

5/31/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Successfully Avoiding Fire Hazards in the Kitchen | SERVPRO® of Pueblo Successfully Avoiding Fire Hazards in the Kitchen | SERVPRO® of Pueblo

The kitchen can be a multifunctional place—a place for family and friends to gather, a place to spend quality time over a cup of coffee or tea and a place to gather for a meal after some delicious eats have been prepared. Unfortunately, without proper precautions, the kitchen can also be a dangerous place where many home fires can occur.

The No. 1 cause of home fires and injuries is cooking fires, and the leading cause of these kitchen fires is unattended cooking.

State Farm paid out over $130 million in homeowners insurance claims related to grease and other cooking fires in 2017. According to the insurance company, these are the worst states for kitchen fires:

  • North Carolina
  • Texas
  • Pennsylvania
  • California
  • Ohio
  • Illinois
  • Maryland
  • New York
  • Alabama
  • Georgia
Safety Tips for the Kitchen

Remaining in the kitchen while cooking is not the only fire safety tip you should be following. Here are some other helpful tips to observe while cooking:

1. Are you wearing clothes safe for cooking? Does your outfit have long, flowing sleeves or is it big and baggy? It could catch on fire if you aren’t careful while cooking over the stove; even grease splatters can ignite clothing material. It’s best to wear short or close-fitted sleeve shirts and make sure any baggy shirts are tucked in or tied back.

2. Are you careful about what you place by the stovetop? Make sure you don’t have kitchen towels, oven mitts, appliance cords or even curtains too close to the stovetop when cooking. Ideally, anything flammable will be moved away from it.

3. Where is your fire extinguisher? Hopefully you have at least one fire extinguisher located in your home, ideally one that is near your kitchen. Make sure you know how to properly use the extinguisher, just in case it is ever needed.

4. How are you disposing of your hot grease? The grease may not be on fire, but it could be hot enough to cause something in the trash to burn. You should let the grease cool a bit and then dispose of it in an old coffee can. Also, know the smoke points of the oils you cook with. Be sure to never subject a low-smoke point oil to high heat when cooking, as it could catch fire.

5. Do you have a fire escape plan established? Thinking about the worst-case scenario is never fun, but it’s better to be prepared rather than unprepared if an emergency were to occur. Go over exit routes and designated meeting points with your family, making sure that everyone knows what to do.

Fire safety in the kitchen is an absolute necessity, as it can help prevent dangerous and destructive cooking fires. If your home has experienced damage from a cooking fire, know that SERVPRO® of Pueblo is here to make it “Like it never even happened.”

 

Ways You Can Protect Your Business From Fire | SERVPRO® of Pueblo

3/8/2019 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Ways You Can Protect Your Business From Fire | SERVPRO® of Pueblo Ways You Can Protect Your Business From Fire | SERVPRO of Pueblo

When you own a business, you must take safety precautions for your business, employees and visitors. One of the things you need to consider and spend a little extra time planning for and working toward is fire prevention.

The Leading Causes of Commercial Structure Fires

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports that the leading causes of structure fires in office properties from 2007–2011 were (in order):

  1. Cooking equipment, 29% of fires
  2. Electrical distribution and lighting equipment, 12% of fires
  3. Heating equipment, 11% of fires
  4. Intentional, 10% of fires
  5. Smoking materials, 9% of fires
  6. Exposure, 4% of fires
  7. Electronic, office or entertainment equipment, 3% of fires

Of those causes, intentional, exposure, and electrical distribution and lighting equipment accounted for the most property damage with 20%, 18% and 15% respectively.

In 2007, the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that fires and explosions accounted for 3% of all workplace fatalities.

In studying more recent numbers, the NFPA estimates that during the period from 2007–2011, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 3,340 fires involving office properties per year. Those fires were responsible for an annual average of four deaths, 44 injuries and $112 million in direct property damage.

You Can Protect Your Business

So what are some of the many steps you can take to protect your business from the risk of fires? By focusing on fire risk assessment, fire prevention and staff education, you will be working to reduce the chance of a fire breaking out.

First, make an assessment of any fire hazard risks in your facility. In some locations, your local government may have a fire marshal who can visit your establishment to help identify these risks and provide guidance on your fire prevention plan.

You’ll want to make sure that the right fire protection equipment is in place. This includes an automatic sprinkler system, smoke detectors and fire extinguishers on each floor.

Most importantly, consider your employees and visitors. Creating a fire plan and reviewing it with your staff will ensure everyone knows what to do in the event of a fire. Conduct fire drills at least once a year to keep that fire safety protocol fresh in their minds, and take time to review evacuation plans and the location of first-aid kits.

Despite best efforts with fire prevention and safety tips, the worst could always happen at your business. If a fire has damaged your business, SERVPRO of Pueblo is available to help make it "Like it never even happened."

Pueblo Smoke and Soot Cleanup

4/20/2016 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Pueblo will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – 719.544.7165

Smoke Alarm Safety Tips

2/3/2014 (Permalink)

With all the recent smoke and fires in the Pueblo area, it is a good reminder to take a second look at your smoke alarms.

Smoke alarms play a vital role in saving lives, and when properly installed, can reduce the risk of fire injury in half. 

The National Fire Protection Association recommends smoke alarms be installed in every bedroom, outside all sleeping quarters and on every level of the house. Business owners should consult the local Fire Marshall to ensure specific building fire codes and smoke detector requirements are met. 

Smoke alarms work best when paired with a fire escape plan. A plan allows your family, employees or clients to escape quickly and safely in an emergency situation. 

SMOKE ALARM SAFETY TIPS

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the home, including the basement. 
  • Smoke alarms should be installed away from the kitchen to prevent false alarms. Generally, they should be at least 10ft. from a cooking appliance. 
  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month using the test button. 
  • Replace batteries in all smoke alarms at least once a year. If an alarm "chirps", the batter is low and should be replaced right away. 
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.  

Avoiding Holiday Hazards

11/20/2013 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Avoiding Holiday Hazards SERVPRO OF PUEBLO 719-544-7165 (BUS)

Pretty lights and decorations add to the feel of the holiday season,k but if they are not used properly your holidays can quickly go from festive to frightening. fortunately, by following a few simple safety tips, you can greatly reduce the fire risk in your home or business this holiday season.

Candle Safety 
Candles are widely used throughout the holidays, and December is the peak month for home candle fires. The National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) statistics show, more then half of all candle fires start because the candles were too close to flammable objects. Consider using flameless candles instead of real candles, keep them at least 12 inches form anything flammable, and remember to extinguish them when leaving a room or going to bed. Use sturdy candleholders that are not likely to tip over and place candles on clear, uncluttered surfaces. 

Christmas Tree Safety
The NFPA also reports, local fire departments respond to an average of 250 Christmas tree related fires each year, with the majority of these fires caused by electrical problems. If you have an artificial tree, be sure it is labeled, certified, or identified by the manufacturer as a fire retardant. If you choose a live tree, pick a tree with fresh, green needles that do not fall off when touched. Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights. The tree should also be clear of all exits. Make sure the tree has plenty of water every day. After the holidays, properly dispose of your tree. Dried- out trees can be a fire hazard and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside the home. 

Decorative Lights 
When purchasing decorative lights, make sure they are properly labeled and have been inspected by an independent testing laboratory. It is also important to ensure you have the correct type of lights; some lights are designed for only indoor or outdoor use, but not both. Carefully inspect light strands before placing them. Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Connect no more than the number of light strings recommended by the manufacturer. Remember to turn off outside decorative lights and Christmas tree lights before leaving or going to bed. 



Your local SERVPRO OF PUEBLO Franchise Professional wish you a safe and happy holiday season!

Holiday Fire Safety Issue

11/6/2013 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Holiday Fire Safety Issue 1-800-SERVPRO

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)  

In 2011, a fire department responded to a fire every 23 seconds and structure fires were reported every 65 seconds. Tragically, fires claimed an average of nine lives per day. Though some fires are unavoidable acts of nature or unpredictable accidents, many fires in the home and workplace are avoidable.

In 2011, approximately 484,500 home fires occurred, causing -2,640 deaths - 15,635 injuries and - $9.7 billion in property loss. The following tips can help reduce the likelihood of a fire in your home or business this year.

10 KEY FIRE SAFETY TIPS

1.    Watch your cooking- Stay in the kitchen if you are frying, grilling or broiling food. Never allow young children around the stove or oven, especially if they are not closely attended.

2.    Give space heaters space! - Keep space heaters at least three feet from anything that is flammable

3.    Smoke outside- If you must smoke inside, have a sturdy, deep ashtray and never smoke in bed.

4.    Keep matches and lighters out of reach.- Keep matches and lighters in high cabinets, preferably under a child lock. 

5.    Inspect electrical cords-Replace cords that are crackeddamaged, have broken plugs or have loose connections these could be very hazardous and the start of fire.

6.    Be careful when using candles- Keep candles at least one foot from anything that can burn. Blow them out before you leave the room or go to sleep.

7.    Have a fire escape plan- Make a fire escape plan and practice it at least twice a year. 

8.    Install smoke alarms- Install alarms on every level of your office or home and inside bedrooms. Interconnect them so they all sound at once. 

9.    Test smoke alarms- Test alarms once a month. Replace batteries once per year or as needed

10. Last but not least, install sprinklers!- This safety measure can help maintain and sometimes even extinguish fires, giving your local fire department a better chance of saving your property.  



Did you know?                         
Thanksgiving is the leading day of the year for home fires involving cooking equipment?